Monthly Archives: December 2017

Animal agriculture – a taxing problem

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Source: Flickr / Brian Hart

The Guardian today published an article about a “green taxation shift” in Norway. Via taxation and other incentives, the Norwegian government encourages its citizens to switch to electric cars. Electric cars do not attract import tax and VAT, are subject to a reduced road tax (which will go down to zero next year), and owners of electric cars do not have to pay road tolls, ferry fees and city emission charges. They don’t pay for parking and can bypass traffic by driving in some bus lanes. To top it off, running costs are lower because in Norway electricity is cheaper than petrol and diesel.

These incentives have resulted in nearly a third of new cars being electric cars, and this proportion is expected to rise to 40% next year. What a great set of policies to nudge people towards more sustainable driving, and for the government to meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets.

But what about the foregone revenue? A politician commented:

Of course the government needs its revenue. But this is part of what we call a green tax shift. You have to tax what you want less of, and promote what you want more of.

Exactly. That’s what I would expect a rational government to do.

With animal agriculture accounting for more greenhouse gas emissions than the global transport sector – including ALL modes of transport, such as cars, motorcycles, trucks, trains, ships, aircraft – wouldn’t it be a rational move to tax meat and other animal products to reduce their vast contribution to climate change?

Research by Chatham House found that it will not be possible to limit temperature rises to below the “danger level” of 2°C if “livestock” production and consumption are not reduced.

 … adopting global dietary guidelines with lower meat consumption would cut food-related emissions by 29%, vegetarian diets by 63%, and vegan diets by 70%

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Source: Flickr / Like_the_Grand_Canyon

Governments in Denmark, Germany, China and Sweden have reportedly discussed creating animal product related taxes in the past two years. An added benefit of a reduced consumption of these products would be the health benefits and cost savings from diets based on plants. Still, increasing taxes for meat and other animal products is not popular with producers and most consumers.

A recent University of Oxford study suggests that if unaddressed, the public health and environmental expenses associated with the increased demand for animal products could be up to $1.6 trillion globally by 2050.

In Australia, 40% of cancer deaths are preventable, claims a recent study. One of the eight lifestyle factors that contribute to these deaths includes a low intake of fruit and vegetables and high intake of red and processed meat. But no, the Australian government does not intend to address its people’s high consumption of animal products. On the contrary, it has been claimed that

The Australian government has a vested interest in ensuring the country’s consumption of meat remains the highest in the world, even to the detriment of the population

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Source: Flickr / theunquietlibrarian

So what are we to do? With our government dragging its feet, it’s up to us to think about the future and make our lifestyle choices more sustainable. A toast to plant-based diets and good health in 2018. Let’s be gentle with our planet and compassionate towards all life that it sustains.

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