Will you support us?

Are you already a member of Humane Research Australia (HRA)? If so, I invite you to renew your membership. It’s only $30 pa. If you are not a member, would you consider becoming one?

I started this blog 3 ½ years ago. I’m the president of HRA, and while I’ve mentioned HRA in some of my blog posts, I haven’t dedicated a whole post to HRA. So this is what we do and what we want to achieve:

Here in Australia, the use of animals in research is very high for such a small country. Only the USA, Japan and China use more animals. We want to see animal experimentation phased out and replaced by humane and human-relevant methods.

Why do we want this? We can’t be sure that insights gained from experiments with animals will be applicable in humans. Animals are not reliable models for human disease. For example, cancer was cured in mice decades ago, but the results didn’t translate to humans. Sadly, scientists know more about mice than humans. Animal research involves many procedures that would be regarded as animal abuse if carried out on our pets. Even when no painful procedures are carried out, the animals are usually kept captive in artificial environments that do not allow for species-specific behaviours. It is a sad situation, both for the lab animals who suffer stress and pain, and for people who miss out on treatments and cures because the research is not relevant to humans.

Many people still think animal experimentation is a necessary evil. But research articles pointing to the many shortcomings of animal research are accumulating*.

So what does HRA do? Below are some of the activities and achievements over the last 12 months.

Campaigns

The Ban Primate Experiments campaign has highlighted the use of non-human primates in invasive, cruel experiments. The macaques, marmosets and baboons involved in these experiments are bred in three government-funded facilities in Australia. While these sentient animals are genetically and cognitively similar to us, they are sufficiently different for primate experiments to result in research findings of little value to humans.

I and another member of HRA’s committee of management (Dr Eleonora Gullone) were signatories to an open letter asking to stop neuroscience research involving non-human primates. It was signed by 22 scientists, primatologists and animal welfare experts, among them Sir David Attenborough and Dr Jane Goodall.

Following a campaign by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and HRA, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) announced earlier this year that it will phase out the use of live animals for its Early Management of Severe Trauma (EMST) program by 2018. EMST trains physicians and Australian Defence Force (ADF) medical officers on treating traumatic injuries. To date, the training involves cutting holes into the throats, chests, and limbs of live animals including dogs and pigs. This will be replaced by human-simulation technology.

Earlier this month the Australian Government introduced a bill to ban animal testing of cosmetic products. This is a result of campaigning by animal welfare groups around the country, and including HRA and Humane Society International’s Be Cruelty Free Campaign.

Case studies

It is difficult for the public to find out exactly what experiments are conducted on animals. Universities and other research institutions are reluctant to provide detail. Not all animal research is published in professional journals. When it is published, the articles are often behind a pay wall and written in a way that does not make much sense to the lay person. HRA has summarised some of these studies in plain English.

These scenarios are not only highly unethical; they are unscientific. Data cannot be extrapolated from one species to another with certainty of success.

We need to challenge the researchers and the funding bodies and encourage them to embrace new technologies – non-animal methodologies that are both more humane and scientifically-valid as they relate specifically to human conditions. This is the critical role of HRA. It’s imperative that the community and HRA supporters particularly, are aware of what is happening and what they can do to help stop it.

Over the last year, the Australian media have reported on cruel experiments. Some of these reports have been re-published in other countries. For example, the Sydney Morning Herald reported about cruel greyhound experiments at Monash University and the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, where the dogs were suffocated and had their hearts removed. Those hearts were then transplanted into other greyhounds who were killed after the procedure.

Animal use statistics

Unlike many other countries, Australia does not have a national collection of animal use data. HRA attempts to make up for this absence of data. The states and territories collect these data, but not all states make them available. HRA collects the available data, publishes them on its website, and provides an estimate of the total number of animals used for research and teaching in Australia. For 2015 this number was close to 10 million animals (this also includes environmental studies where animals were observed rather than experimented on).

Submissions

HRA writes submissions to government bodies, encourages its members and the public to write submissions, and provides background information to assist with submission writing. At present, the proposed Code of Practice for the Keeping of Racing Greyhounds (in Victoria) is open for public comment until 14 August 2017.

This is not all we do. For example, we also lobby the federal government and funding agencies to redirect funding away from animal experimentation and instead provide financial incentives to researchers to develop alternatives to animals. This lobbying takes considerable time and resources. We need your financial support to continue this work, and your assistance to help us to do this is greatly appreciated.

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter , or subscribe to our e-news to learn more about our work.

Here is a video of me (and my best mate Sheba) asking you to support us in the important work we do to end cruel and unnecessary animal experiments. If you have a look at the video, you’ll see that we don’t waste money on media production. It was done in-house, in the HRA office, with our multi-talented CEO Helen Marston directing, filming and editing.

Unlike many other charities, HRA does not have DGR (Deductible Gift Recipient) status – because our work is not classified as public benevolent, and does not involve “hands on” care of animals. This means that we do not qualify for many philanthropic grants that are available and which many charities depend on for their continued work. It also means that we are unable to take advantage of various other schemes such as workplace giving as these also require DGR status.

Furthermore, we do not receive ANY government funding. We are therefore solely reliant on memberships and donations to fund the important work that we undertake towards ending cruel and unnecessary animal experiments.

Thank you for reading this, and I’m more than happy to respond to any questions and/or suggestions.

* On the HRA website, we have dedicated a page to links to academic papers, conference proceedings and government reports that show animals as bad models for human medicines and treatments. Search for “bias” (without the quotation marks) on this web page.

 

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